Changes to Licensing Act: Live Music Act

From 1st of October there is a rather large change to the Licensing Act 2003 in reference to live music. This has come about by changes to the Primary Legislation (Act) which includes the new Live Music Act. So what does it mean to the man on the street?

Here are the main changes and a LINK to the DCMS website

  • Remove the licensing requirement for un-amplified live music taking place between 8am and 11pm in all venues, subject to the right of a licensing authority to impose conditions about live music following a review of a premises licence or club premises certificate relating to premises authorised to supply alcohol for consumption on the premises
  • Remove the licensing requirement for amplified live music taking place between 8am and 11pm before audiences of no more than 200 persons on premises authorised to supply alcohol for consumption on the premises, subject to the right of a licensing authority to impose conditions about live music following a review of a premises licence or club premises certificate
  • Remove the licensing requirement for amplified live music taking place between 8am and 11pm before audiences of no more than 200 persons in workplaces not otherwise licensed under the 2003 Act (or licensed only for the provision of late night refreshment)
  • Remove the licensing requirement for the provision of entertainment facilities
  • Widen the licensing exemption for live music integral to a performance of Morris dancing or dancing of a similar type, so that the exemption applies to live or recorded music instead of un-amplified live music.

In the past to play any type of music apart from background (radio etc) you would have to have a licence to do this. This was granted by Cornwall Council. As long as your aims were in accordance with the Licensing Act and the Licensing Objectives: The prevention of crime and disorder; Public safety; Prevention of public nuisance; and The protection of children from harm and no objections from the statutory agencies and interested parties (public, town and parish council’s) a licence would be granted. If there was objections, a Licensing Hearing would take place.

It is going to be interesting to see if these changes increase noise complaints from the public etc. Less bureaucracy is welcomed, but not if actually causes more trouble. At least the Government did not go ahead with the utterly bonkers change of not needing a regulated entertainment licence for events under 5000!

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