And that was the Election

They say a week is a longtime in politics, but I would say a day can change everything too. Take Polling Day and the actual count. In Cornwall, the count is taken the day after the polls close. A sensible decision, and one I fully support. However, for a candidate it has to be one of the most nerve-racking day you will endure. It really is all or nothing. So how did it turn out?

Before a vote was cast the make up of Cornwall Council was going to change, as 25 Councillors did not see re-election. Many of these former colleagues will be missed, but I understand why they did not seek re-election. Now it turns out that out of 123 Councillors, 53 will be new. Though to be fair, quite a few have served on either a District, or County Council.

The actual make up of the Council using the election results is as follows:

Now this could change a little, as it has been known people do cross the floor and join other groups/parties soon after an election. I think two will cross the floor, in the next few weeks/months. Those elected at Independent do not always come together in a Independent Group. Some like to standalone. So while the Independents seem to have the second largest gang, it might not work out that way.

So where does that leave the Council? Well not one group has the majority to form a Cabinet and elect a Leader of the Council. Two things could happen now; one of the groups tries to form a minority Council, or there is another coalition between one or more of the groups. I would be surprised if one group tired to form a minority administration, but you never know. That leaves the most likely scenario as a coalition.

e Conservative Group went to the largest group, to the third largest. From the 2009 election when they had 50 Councillors, they have gone down to 31.

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